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Winter Warfare Info/Tips/Tricks

 
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Owl
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:34 pm    Post subject: Winter Warfare Info/Tips/Tricks Reply with quote

Hey all,
With all of the discussion about winter events and winter warfare in general, I thought it might be a good idea to create a separate thread discussing the subject so the event thread doesn't get too clogged up.
Post anything info/tips/tricks you feel are relevant.

I did my first period winter event today(Temp: -10, 1' of snow on the ground). To say it was a learning experience was an understatement.
2 major things I learned(IE mistakes I made so you don't have to):

1) Trial your footwear before the event. Long story short, I didn't do this, and almost got frostbitten toes as a result. Put on the socks and boots you'll be wearing, and go for a hike(literally). Make sure your feet are insulated enough, and are getting good circulation. In my case I had too many pairs of socks on, which cut-off circulation and made my feet much colder much faster.

2) Candles are a great source of heat that can be set-up and torn down almost instantly. Great for warming hands and feet, and add almost no weight to your kit.


Other tip I learned while in Cadets:

1) Never fill your canteen all the way, fill it about 3/4 full. The water will slosh around as you move, preventing it from freezing.


A question for the group:

1) What's everyone's opinion on using modern thermal underwear, hand/toe warmers/other modern aids? Farby or reasonable?

So anyone else have info/tips/tricks they want to share?
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Wolfgang Schwarz
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thermals are not necessary if you dress in layers and know what you wear. It gets too warm, take one layer off, pack it and put it on your back. It's better to carry extra kilo in warm weather than freeze your butt when it gets cold.
I usually fill up my canteen all the way up. Worst case scenario, it starts freezing before we stop for a coffee and I just dump some water. It's always good to have extra H2O.
Footwear is probably number one thing you should consider when going out to an event. Like you said, it has to be comfortable and dependable. I like putting CF issued silicon water repellant on my boots morning before the event.
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1. Kompanie, SS-Panzergrenadier Regiment 20,
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Johann Hansen
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wool socks are your best friend. Proper, genuine wool. No Wal-Mart wool-blend crap. Seal skin socks are great too, depending on just how cold it is.

I used Sno-Seal on my boots this past event, worked amazingly.

Regarding thermies and such... Don't exactly have to. I've got a repop wool sweater I wear over my service shirt, oodles warm. Especially ontop of wool tunic and/or mantel.

Trousers - I've got a set of East German longjohns/undies. Look close, and work phenomenal.

Key part is though, nobody is going to see what is under-neath your trousers or tunic.

Hand warmers - If you really must. Like wool socks, wool gloves are great.
I've sometimes worn rubber gloves under them to keep water out.

Better to be a bit un-authentic then to get frost bite or some such.
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Roland Krieger
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I came up in the Forces before the time of Gortex, and "wicking" fabrics.

The tech was not much more advanced than what was used at the tail end of WWII

wool, and layers , was how it was done and it still works today.

Keeping dry is the key, not sweating .. you have to ride that fine line between not cold enough to shiver and not hot enough to sweat.

For many of us , footwear is going to be the challenge..and so we are likely to permit some concessions to authenticity in that regard.

Though pretty good felt boots can be found,, post war with rubber soles .. but other than the soles indistinguishable from WWII versions.
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Roland Krieger (reenactor Brian McIlmoyle)
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shiftsup
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Layers. Clothing made of wool. Wool can absorb water and still retain its thermal qualities. Last 2 winter events I attended everything I wore was either original or period repro and I was fine.

Owning multiple pairs of wool socks, gloves and a second set of boots is a good idea.

Modern items, from hand warmers to salamander heaters should be ok and kept at a first aid area for those that require it.


Another thing that doesn't get mentioned much is physical fitness. Especially for us older guys ( I am 44). Shedding the uneeded pounds and the abillity to not get tired after a few hours goes along way.
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Sturmmann Weiss
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ya so hit the gym all u flabby fuks
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Carl Muller



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PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As far as physical fitness, endurance over strength. Being able to maintain low level activity with low level exertion will help keep you dry. Dehydration in the cold is also something to be careful of.

When outside for prolonged periods in the winter, most cold related incidents occur at near freezing temperatures, not really cold temperatures. When its really cold, its dry, people dress for it and tend not to sweat. Frost bite is painful so people know there is a problem and head for cover early.

The damp near freezing temperatures generate more problems because the issues creep up on you. Most hypothermic cases occur in those conditions.
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Schütze Carl Muller
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leecas
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have no issue in using modern thermal underwear or anything else you think will get you through the day. As long as it's under your uniform and no one can see it.

Most of the guys have already said it... wool and layers are your best friend.

As for boots most people make the mistake of wearing too many socks and their feet are so tight in the boots that there is no circulation. To stay warm that blood needs to flow. I wear period wool socks and loosen my boots a little. Last event I went into the creek, got a soaker and by end of day my feet were dry and warm.

Gloves are also very important... I again use period gloves. I've used them the last two weekends and hands never once felt cold.

When it comes to weather.... always bring more. You can ditch what you don't need but if you didn't bring what you do need... you are going to have a really shitty day. And when that happens... it stops being fun.
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